Posts Tagged ‘bike computer’

Garmin 810 firmware update: v2.7

Monday, August 26th, 2013

Since introducing the Edge 810, Garmin has produced a number of firmware updates. One or two have been problematic for me. For instance, firmware v2.6 constantly “forgot” how to pair with my HRM and cadence/speed sensor, but the latest – v2.7 – seems to be more reliable.

Garmin Edge 810 GPS computer

Garmin Edge 810 GPS computer

Visiting connect.garmin.com should prompt a check of your 810’s firmware as long as it’s connected to your computer.

I find the Garmin WebUpdater a more solid application which will also update any other Garmin GPS device you may own.

The v2.7 update is fairly big and Garmin advises you to back up your data. I found data was still there when the 810 was restarted, but some of the settings were wiped. In particular check map settings – I found every map.img option had been checked – and screen options. Curiously, the device found my HRM and cadence/speed sensor without having to pair them

If you use the OpenStreetMap US map .img it was last updated 7.29.2013. You can find the latest version here. It’s a 3gb+ file so be careful where you download it and expect it to take a while.

More details on handling maps on your 810/800 here …

Interesting news from Garmin; they are introducing a couple of POV – point of view – camera, the Virb and Virb Elite, which will also interface with the 810 computer and your Android/iPhone device.

I’m not certain yet whether this will be via ANT+ or BlueTooth. The Virb Elite will also include GPS functions although whether it’s a stand alone substitute for a dedicated GPS device remains to be seen. The interactive functions will be the subject of a future 810 firmware update.

The Garmin Virb POV cam

The Garmin Virb POV cam


If you’re seeking information on other topics click on any item in Halter’s Tag Cloud in the right hand column of this blog …


Alan That British Bloke | OldCranksCC Forum


Keeping Tracks

Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

You’ve got the bike computer. Know how far you’ve been and how fast? And how many trees you’ve saved – the Cateye Commuter. But now you want a bit more detail; a record of the route, how much climbing? Your heart-rate? Power output? Race your imaginary friend in real time? Maybe even follow a planned route with directions? Or post progress reports to the interwebs …

CatEye Stealth 50 - GPS and ANT+ for $150

CatEye Stealth 50 – GPS and ANT+ for $150

The introduction of GPS Global Positioning System – capability to bicycle computers has transformed the market for bicycle electronics.

And just because you’re not a “racer“, it doesn’t mean that selective use of the déluge of information these devices provide isn’t useful to everyone, whether they’re mapophiles – I don’t know, I just made it up – or total fitness freaks, erm, I meant, keen recreational riders …

Garmin Edge 510 and Garmin Edge 810 - ANT+ and Bluetooth technology

Garmin Edge 510 and Garmin Edge 810 – ANT+ and Bluetooth technology

So, let’s look at a few features:

GPS – Any unit of this type makes use of the GPS to pinpoint its exact location on the Earth’s surface. This means making use of relativity and other out-there stuff from the realm of astrophysics.

A bicycle GPS unit saves a series of these points as you move from which it can calculate, speed, direction and other data, which is displayed in real-time on-screen and/or subsequently uploaded to a cycling GPS website and the route superimposed onto a map to provide a record of your ride. Most websites will also extrapolate speed, elevation and other data.

If you want to record heart-rate, cadence and real-time power-output you will need a GPS computer with ANT+.

Cue-sheet displayed on Garmin Edge 810

Cue-sheet displayed on Garmin Edge 810

ANT+ – is a standard which enables an enabled computer to interrogate and record data from third-party wireless devices and sensors. Typical for a cyclist might be sensors for heart-rate/zone-training, cadence/speed and power-meters. If you’re a keen winter trainer, the cadence/speed sensor is useful for recording stationary sessions.

BlueTooth – Another more recent development, for bicycle computers anyway, enables the device to pair with other BlueTooth devices, such as your smartphone. This has the possibility of recording your ride, position, performance indicators, etc, directly to the interwebs in real-time, so that friends on FaceBook, say, or Strava – see below – can view your progress while you’re on your ride …

Garmin Edge 810 with map on screen

Garmin Edge 810 with map on screen

So, what features do you require?

Basic GPS Computer : Records map of individual rides. Displays basic trip information such as speed, distance, average speed. Upload and save trip data via home computer to bike mapping site : Garmin Edge 200, Cateye Stealth 10

GPS Computer with ANT+ : As above, and depending on extra sensors, provides real-time data such as heart-rate, time-in-zone, etc,. Uploads to bike-mapping/traing website for analysis : Garmin Edge 510, Garmin Edge 810, Cateye Stealth 50

GPS Computer with BlueTooth : will combine with your smartphone to connect to social media and performance websites to track progress in real-time and interactive feed-back : Garmin Edge 510, Garmin Edge 810

Onscreen map display and cue-sheets : The Garmin Edge 810 can display a detailed progress map and a cue-sheet from downloaded routes giving written directions, “<<< Turn left onto Church Road in 200yds“. It can also sound an audible alarm as you approach route nodes.

Other facilities; return to start – good if you’re lost or forgotten where your car is, find – deli, coffee shop, address, etc …

It can also display maps from Garmin.com and OpenStreetMap.org.

The Garmin Edge 510 displays the bike’s track but no map. Downloaded routes/cuesheets are only displayed as line representing the twists and turns.

Useful bike mapping websites are:

RideWithGPS - other bicycle route mapping sites are available ...

RideWithGPS – other bicycle route mapping sites are available …

Halter’s currently stock; Cateye Stealth 50, Garmin Edge 200, 510 and 810. From $120 – basic – to $650 – heart-rate and cadence sensor kit, map and BlueTooth. Power-meters? Think $1500.

Alternatives? There are plenty of smartphone apps out there with impressive abilities but will be challenged in the run-time stakes. A dedicated GPS unit can run from 12-16hours. A phone will be pressed after 2-3hours.


If you’re seeking information on other topics click on any item in Halter’s Tag Cloud in the right hand column of this blog …


Alan That British Bloke


Cateye Stealth50 GPS Computer- CC-GL50

Monday, May 6th, 2013

Designed for the committed cyclist, the Stealth 50 is GPS and ANT+ enabled, so it works with CatEye or third party ANT+ compatible power, heart rate, cadence and speed sensors.

Designed for the competitive cyclist, the Stealth 50 is GPS and ANT+ enabled, so it works with CatEye or third party ANT+ compatible power, heart rate, cadence and speed sensors.

Designed for the competitive cyclist, the Stealth 50 is GPS and ANT+ enabled, so it works with CatEye or third party ANT+ compatible power, heart rate, cadence and speed sensors.

Cateye have recently taken a step into the GPS enhanced bicycle computer market. First up is the GPS and ANT+ enabled Stealth50 computer, HRM belt and cadence sensor.

The Stealth 50 is a simple power meter that is ANT+ compatible, so it works with CatEye or third party ANT+ power, heart rate, cadence and speed sensors.

Track basic cycling data and combine with power, heart rate and cadence data to target and reach training goals.

Compatible with third party ANT+ devices

Compatible with third party ANT+ devices

Upload ride data to web-based training sites, such as CatEyeAtlas.com and TrainingPeaksTM, where you can visualize your activity, analyze performance and share your ride.

Other features include a full-time backlight, auto-stop/start and programmable odometer. The Stealth 50 is waterproof, USB rechargeable and can be used on multiple bikes, so you’ll always be ready to ride.
 
 
 
Cateye CC-GL50Stealth50 – $149.99
Cateye HR-11 ANT+ Heart Rate Sensor – $59.99
Cateye ISC-11 ANT+ Speed & Cadence sensor – $59.99


If you’re seeking information on other topics click on any item in Halter’s Tag Cloud in the right hand column of this blog …


Alan That British Bloke


Biketronics

Friday, March 15th, 2013
A bicycle computer provides information such as speed and distance cycled.

A bicycle computer provides information such as speed and distance cycled.

One of the first accessories purchasers of new bike make is that of a bike computer. Everyone wants to know how fast they’re going and how far they’ve ridden.

A bike computer will provide information such as speed, average speed, top speed, trip distance, odometer and time of day.

It works by using a magnetic sensor, usually situated by the front wheel, and a head unit which fits on the stem or handlebars.

A basic computer is connected to the sensor with a wire. If you’re installing a wired computer you need to figure out a route for the wire from the sensor to the head unit. Expect to pay around $20-$30.

In use the wires have a tendency to catch and break, especially when the bike is being loaded into or onto a car. Replacement wire harnesses may cost nearly as much as the computer did in the first place.

A wireless computer uses digital radio technology to communicate from the sensor to the computer. This looks neat and eliminates the problem of cable routing and broken wires. A basic wireless computer costs around $60-$70.

You can expect a couple of years battery life for computers and wireless sensors.

This triple wireless computer senses heart rate and pedaling cadence

This triple wireless computer senses heart rate and pedaling cadence

If you require more information such as cadence – the rate at which you are spinning the pedals – or heart-rate a double or triple wireless bike computer will provide such information.

Cadence is detected from a sensor situated on the chain-stay while heart-rate requires wearing a monitor belt across the chest.

If you require this much information then expect to pay around $150. This is the least expensive way of collecting such data.

GPS detects your position and speed

GPS detects your position and speed

The big development in the past few years has been in devices which use the Global Positioning System to determine your speed and position.

As well as making a record of your ride on the road or on the trail, more sophisticated devices can keep track of your heart-rate, cadence and power output when associated with the appropriate sensors.

You can also plan a route which can be uploaded to the GPS unit which, according to how sophisticated it is, can show a cue sheet and/or route map with directions for planned rides.

Garmin Edge 800/810 - displays maps and cue-sheet information

Garmin Edge 800/810 – displays maps and cue-sheet information

A basic GPS unit will gather speed and route information from a ride which can then be uploaded to a website which will then be able to display your route, altitude profile and other data on screen.

More expensive units will also have ANT+, a means whereby the head unit can communicate with other ANT+ enabled sensors such as heart-rate monitors, cadence sensors and power-meters. This data can also be displayed and analysed on computer to provide a comprehensive picture of your ride.

The most advanced devices are capable of displaying detailed maps and providing detailed cue-sheets and directions as well as features such as “return to start”, finding addresses and coffee stops, etc.

The Wahoo RFKLT uses your phone's computing capacity and displays data  on your handlebars

The Wahoo RFKLT uses your phone’s computing capacity and displays data on your handlebars

Most GPS units have programmable screens which can present exactly the information you require. Some have touch screens.

Other refinements include real-time links to social media and performance cycling websites so you can post live reports of where you are and compare your times to others who have previously ridden your section of the route.

Many of these advanced functions can be done by using an appropriate app on your GPS-enabled smart-phone. However, running apps of this type makes a heavy draw on the phone’s battery capacity and limits their use to no more than a couple of hours. Dedicated GPS units will run over 12 hours in most cases.

However, new devices which use the processing capacity of your phone, but display data on a secondary screen on your handlebars while your phone is tucked away safely in your pocket or bike-bag, will be available shortly. This will radically extend the battery duration of your phone.

GPS computers run from under $150 to about $600. Detailed or specialist maps are extra. ANT+ accessories such as heart-rate or cadence sensors are around $60 each. ANT+ power-meters around $1500.

So, whether you’re a casual rider just intent on a gentle saunter or in training for the next big event, a bicycle computer can provide everything from the basic “how far and how fast” to analysis of power output and performance and nice maps of your favorite routes.


Halter’s stocks bicycle computers by Cateye, including the triple wireless heart-rate/cadence CC-RD430DW and, soon to be available, Strada Micro.

We carry the full range of Garmin Edge GPS enabled computers, sensors and accessories. Cateye Stealth GPS computers are on their way and we await news of when the Wahoo phone accessories will become generally available.

If you’re seeking information on other topics click on any item in Halter’s Tag Cloud in the right hand column of this blog …


Alan That British Bloke


 
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