Archive for June, 2013

Make the most of your Garmin Edge 810/800 – Turn-by-turn/Cue Sheets

Sunday, June 30th, 2013

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Apart from being able to display a real-time map on screen, the Garmin Edge 810/800 has another useful talent, the ability to display turn-by-turn instructions so you can follow pre-planned routes.

There are a number of bike mapping and route planning websites. I’ve found ridewithgps.com to be a good one. Just register and start planning a route. It will then compile a printable cue-sheet for if you don’t have a compatible GPS unit and a .tcx file for uploading to your Garmin 810 which can be used for turn-by-turn display.

Plan your route on your favorite bike mapping website

Plan your route on your favorite bike mapping website

While planning and plotting your route make sure you use the correct website settings. Most will have options for walking/cycling/driving and whether to follow roads and other refinements. I like ridewithgps.com’s option to use the OSM Cycle Map which has extra information appropriate for cycling.

Once you’ve saved your route you will have a number of options on how to export it.

ridewithgps.com's .tcx format file contains all the data required to display turn-by-turn instructions on a Garmin 810/800

ridewithgps.com’s .tcx format file contains all the data required to display turn-by-turn instructions on a Garmin 810/800

Download the .tcx file, then copy it into the New Files folder on the MicroSD card in your Garmin. I’m assuming by this stage you’ll be familiar with how to use your computer’s file explorer to do this and that you have already set your Garmin to use the card for data recording … see this if you’re not familiar with the Garmin 810/800.

Find the NewFiles folder on your MicroSD card mounted in your Garmin ...

Find the NewFiles folder on your MicroSD card mounted in your Garmin …

... and COPY your .tcx file into the NewFiles folder

… and COPY your .tcx file into the NewFiles folder

On removing the Garmin from your computer and turning it on, the unit will read the file in the NewFiles folder and process it and leave it as a .fit file in the Courses folder.

From the front page ...

From the front page …

... access your courses ...

… access your courses …

... and there it is

… and there it is

You can review information on your Course ...

You can review information on your Course …

... including a Course profile ...

… including a Course profile …

... even more data about your course

… even more data about your course

Please post questions, points and any other helpful advice in the Comments box below.


If you’re seeking information on other topics click on any item in Halter’s Tag Cloud in the right hand column of this blog …


Alan That British Bloke | OldCranksCC Forum


30 in 30 contest 2013 is back …

Friday, June 28th, 2013

Win $100 Halter’s gift certificate for simply riding your bike like crazy in JULY.

Rules are are follows :

1: You must ride at least one hour of each day in the month of July

2: You must take photos of yourself at at 15 unique spots. This is to get you out to different riding areas. Post pics on our facebook page so we can cheer you along during the month of July

3: Hours can be accumulated on any type of bike, but they must all be outdoors

4: NO crybabies

Last time we did this, we had about a dozen people complete the challenge. It is harder than it seems

Note:  ideally hours will be tracked by GPS.

Good luck,

Jason


Make the most of your Garmin Edge 810/800 – Maps

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

One of the big developments in bike electronics in the last few years has been the adoption of GPS capability for bike-mounted computers.

The Garmin Edge 810 - GPS on your handlebars

The Garmin Edge 810 – GPS on your handlebars

Extenders from K-Edge and SRAM place your computer more in your line of sight

Extenders from K-Edge and SRAM place your computer more in your line of sight

In the past bicycle computers have displayed your speed, distance traveled and other real-time information.

GPS-enabled computers now have the ability to track your route for uploading to your favorite mapping website, communicate with other devices, such as a heart-rate monitor, cadence/speed sensors, power-meters, your phone and even your bathroom scales.

Riders requiring real-time mapping will have to consider the Garmin Edge 810. This computer is able to display your position on a graphical map, as well as record all aspects of your ride, communicate with ANT+ devices such as HRMs, cadence/speed sensors and power meters.

So, do you have or are considering a Garmin Edge 810? Here are a few things that might help make the most of its ability to use and display maps.

Most of this also applies to the Garmin Edge 800 although the settings menu will vary slightly.

Unless you buy the complete Garmin 810 kit the unit will require an .img map file in order to be able to display a detailed topographic map on screen. This is normally stored on a MicroSD card supplied with the kit and slotted into the 810.

You can purchase the Garmin US City Nav map if you don’t already have it, or you can search for, and download a US map from OpenStreetMap.org for free. This is a little tricky so you can also try here … for the latest version. Warning: This is a huge file – 3GB+ – probably best to avoid doing this if you have an expensive data tariff or you’re roaming.

The Garmin map comes on its own MicroSD card. If you’re going to source your own map then an 8Gb MicroSD card is a good start. I find a 16Gb card works okay on my Garmin 810.

Set your Garmin to use the MicroSD card

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To install the map, first of all insert the card into the Garmin and using Settings >>> System >>> Data Recording >>>  Record To xxxxxx  >>> Select Memory Card.

Return to the Front Page and press the Start/Stop button to start recording for a few seconds. You don’t need to be riding the bike for this process. The Garmin will format and install a series of folders onto the MicroSD card.

Turn the device off and connect to your computer via a USB cable. Using your file explorer you should see something like this – Mac users should be able to recognize a similar layout. Drive letters will vary.

Your file explorer should show the Garmin and MicroSD card as additional drives

Your file explorer should show the Garmin and MicroSD card as additional drives

Click on Removable Disk and you should see the Garmin has installed a series of folders onto the card, the root being Garmin and a series of sub-folders.

The ring around "New Files" is for another day ...

The ring around “New Files” is for another day …

If using the OSM map copy it into the Garmin folder. In my case I’ve also installed the Garmin map, but given both maps distinctive names – xxxxx.img.

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This means I can switch between maps in my Garmin device. There’s no real advantage in this other than it can be done, but if you’re intending to use the Garmin abroad it would be useful to have, say, North America and European .img files on board.

To reach the Garmin 810’s map selection setting which can be set differently for each Activity Profile you might have on your device go Settings >>> Activity Profile >>> Navigation >>> Map >>> Map Information Select Map >>> select your map.

I’ve included a comparison between the Garmin map and the OSM map. OSM includes more topological info in the display in the form of trees and other representations.

Garmin's US map displayed at Halter's Cycles

Garmin’s US map displayed at Halter’s Cycles

OpenStreetMap's US map displayed at Halter's Cycles

OpenStreetMap’s US map displayed at Halter’s Cycles

Both differ in terms of local road detail, neither for the better in this regard.

Next: Using Cue Sheets / Turn-by-turn display on your Garmin Edge 810/800.


If you’re seeking information on other topics click on any item in Halter’s Tag Cloud in the right hand column of this blog …


Alan That British Bloke | OldCranksCC Forum


Keep It Pumped

Monday, June 24th, 2013

So, your tires were pumped up when you put your bike away in the garage last year, and now they’re flat. Really?

Flat tire? It was okay when I bought the bike ...

Flat tire? It was okay when I bought the bike …

Some people seem genuinely surprised that bike tires do not stay inflated for life. I mean, car tires do, don’t they?

Well actually no … However, bicycle tires retain a very small volume of air compared to a car tire and the minute seepage of air through the inner tube and tire casing which naturally occurs in just a few days will have a big impact on the pressure within.

You can find the correct pressure printed or molded onto the wall of the tire - this one reads 115PSI/125PSI

You can find the correct pressure printed or molded onto the wall of the tire – this one reads 115PSI/125PSI

Soft, or under-inflated tires will be a drag to ride, hold the road poorly and raise the risk of a puncture due to a pinch flat or inability to resist piercing.

A correctly inflated tire will roll on the road with less effort, you’ll go further for less, resist flats better and just be safer.

As a guide, but check the information molded onto the sidewall of your tire:

Every cyclist's essential accessory - a pump

Every cyclist’s essential accessory – a pump

  • Road bikes : check your pressure and pump before every ride – about 105PSI-120PSI, maybe less if you’re very small.
  • Mountain bikes : at least weekly, but maybe before every ride if you’re wanting to match tire pressure to the prevailing conditions.
  • Hybrid Bikes : at least weekly – between 60PSI-70PSI, but check tire sidewall.
  • Children’s bikes : at least weekly – 40PSI-60PSI. Pinch flats due to under-inflation is the biggest cause of flats on children’s bikes.

More advice about pumps and fixing flat tires here, here … and here.


If you’re seeking information on other topics click on any item in Halter’s Tag Cloud in the right hand column of this blog …


Alan That British Bloke | OldCranksCC Forum


July 4th, 2013 – Shop Closed

Friday, June 21st, 2013

Halter’s Cycles will be closed this July 4th and reopen, as usual, on Friday, July 5th at 11.00am.

Join Uncle Sam ... ride a bike ...

Join Uncle Sam … ride a bike …


Then it’s back to regular summer hours:

Monday : 11.00am – 7.00pm
Tuesday : 11.00am – 7.00pm
Wednesday : 11.00am – 7.00pm
Thursday : 11.00am – 7.00pm
Friday : 11.00am – 7.00pm
Saturday : 10.00am – 5.00pm
Sunday : CLOSED – gone ridin’

Find a Friend …

Tuesday, June 11th, 2013

Looking for rides, ride companions and routes in central Jersey? Or just want to talk bikes? Try these local cycling websites.

www.mtbnj.com - off-road

www.mtbnj.com – off-road

If you’re into information, discussion, news and opinion about mountain biking in the local area then look no further than mtbnj.com.

www.mtbnj.com - off-road

www.mtbnj.com – off-road

This long established site for mountain-bikers in NJ has sections for everyone from newbies looking for trail advice and trail conditions to discussions on beer. Alan, that British Bloke, has reservations about whether Americans can actually discuss beer, however, if you have an issue with that see him.

www.oldcranks.cc - on road

www.oldcranks.cc – on road

www.oldcranks.cc - on road

www.oldcranks.cc – on road

Until now, roadies have not really had a local forum. But now, look no further than oldcranks.cc.

Whether you’re new to road-riding on the road and looking for someone to guide you through the practice of clipless pedals, need a buddy to initiate you to the jungle that is the NJ road system, just fancy a chat about who will win the Tour, or are seeking a partner for your trans-Siberia tour, take a look.

Both forums require a registration process before you can contribute.

 

As far as I know mtbnj.com is free of commercial interest. oldcranks.cc has been set up by yours truly and is in the course of development according to the direction members would like to take.

So why not take a look?


If you’re seeking information on other topics click on any item in Halter’s Tag Cloud in the right hand column of this blog …


Alan That British Bloke


 
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